Newsletters and Notes

Newsletters are sent regularly to Members by email. The most recent six are stored here with the latest at the top. Short Notes are collected on another page (latest on top), as are Reports or Summaries of our  Lectures.

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(Newsletter of 7th Nov. 2019)

Dear all,
Change to next week's lecture - still in Marlborough Road Methodist Church.
Shortly after sending my last message with all the information about next Thursday's lecture I had an email from Helen Wass to say that, with much regret, she wouldn't be able to come and speak to us next week because HS2 and all its works, as a publicly-funded body with a possibly uncertain future after the election, has to go into 'purdah' during the election campaign. Very annoying! However, we have managed to get Wendy Morrison, an archaeologist who has been undertaking some investigations at Steane (near Hinton in the Hedges) , and has also been involved with some major works in the Chilterns and on hillforts, to come and talk to us next Thursday. She had to check the rules but knows that she can talk to us about Steane as that is not publicly-funded. I know that many of you will be disappointed, but we will try to book Helen Wass in for next season and by then there will probably be more investigations and finds to tell us about.
As soon as I have more information - like Wendy's title - I will let you all know.
With best wishes
Deborah Hayter

 

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(Newsletter of 2Nov 2019)

Dear all,

NB next lecture takes place in Marlborough Road Methodist Church.


Our next speaker is a coup for the society. We have Dr. Helen J. Wass coming to talk to us about what the archaeological investigations along the route of HS2 have revealed. This is the largest group of archaeological digs that has ever taken place in this country, and Helen Wass is the archaeologist in charge of the whole lot. An enormous amount of archaeological information has already been unearthed, including some previously unknown sites, and there is lots more to come.
Her lecture is entitled People, Time, Place: the archaeology and historic environment revealed by HS2 and she writes: "Before we build the bridges, tunnels, tracks and stations for HS2 an unprecedented amount of archaeological work will take place – the largest ever programme of investigation in the UK. I will outline the opportunities and challenges that HS2 offers in terms of knowledge creation, engagement and legacy. With site works now underway there will be recent discoveries to share."
We know that archaeology often attracts large audiences, so we have transferred this lecture to the Marlborough Road Methodist church so please make sure you head in the right direction on Thursday November 14th.
Helen Wass’ interest in the past started early - she grew up in Northumberland and had many trips to Hadrian’s Wall. On HS2 she says that she is really excited about sharing the stories that will be revealed about our ancestors who lived along the route.
I have attached a poster for this lecture in the hopes that some of you might print it out and put it up on a local notice board.
This weekend – November 2nd and 3rd the Steeple Aston Village Archive Trust has an exhibition of old photographs of the village from their archive on display in the village hall. Entry is free, but donations will be welcomed. (Sat 2 – 6 pm and Sun (12 – 4 pm).
On Saturday 16th November there will be a celebration in Banbury Museum to mark the return of the Hornton Anglo-Saxon brooches and beads, dating from the 6th century AD. They were once owned by a wealthy Saxon woman living in Hornton near Banbury, and were discovered in the 1880s. Since then they have been in the British Museum, but now 140 years later they are coming back to Oxfordshire and will be displayed in Banbury Museum.
The brooches will be unveiled formally on November 16th, and at 7pm John Blair, Professor of Medieval History and Archaeology, the Queens College Oxford, will give a lecture on The Early Anglo-Saxons in Oxfordshire: New Evidence and New Ideas, referring to the Hornton brooches.

Tickets £20 per person to include a glass of wine; 6 – 8 pm.
Book through Banbury Museum’s website.

There are still some spaces on the OLHA autumn study day on Saturday 16 November at New College, Oxford. The subject is how to use manorial documents for local and family history research. The day will include the launch of the Oxfordshire Manorial Documents Register which contains almost 4,000 references to records from 370 manors.

Further details and on-line booking here. Or download a postal booking form here

The Parish in Wartime: Bishop Gore’s Visitations of Oxfordshire, 1914 and 1918 is the latest volume from the Oxfordshire Record Society (ORS). The book, edited by Mark Smith (Associate Professor in History at the University of Oxford’s Department for Continuing Education) uses surveys of clerical life in 1914 and 1918 - including information on services, social activities, and size of congregations - to shed new light on the importance of the church in Oxfordshire communities immediately before and during the First World War. It also examines how the conflict proved to be a catalyst for social and religious change thereafter.

Further information and ordering here. The volume is currently available at a specially discounted launch price. Moreover, members of ORS receive a copy for free in addition to other member benefits. As annual membership costs only £18 (and the book retails at £30), this is a good deal.
Finally, the OLHA monthly newsletter for October is now available with information about talks and exhibitions going on all over the county. To access it click this url
With best wishes
Deborah Hayter

 

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(Newsletter of 6 Oct 2019)

Dear all,
This week on Thursday we have the society’s second lecture of the season in the Education Room of Banbury Museum. Graham Evans will be talking about The Battle of Edgcote 1469: re-evaluating the evidence. The Northamptonshire Battlefields Society has done much good work researching the battles that have taken place in the county, and 2019 sees the 550th anniversary of the Battle of Edgcote. Often overlooked or misunderstood, the battle had a major impact in both England and Wales. Graham will examine the sources in depth to explain what we actually do and do not know about this apparently obscure piece of medieval history. Edgcote is just over the border in Northamptonshire but is certainly within ‘Banburyshire’.

Graham Evans studied Modern & Medieval History at the University of Sheffield. He is the Secretary of the Northamptonshire Battlefields Society, and edits the Society's quarterly newsletter, "The Wild Rat". A regular writer and blogger on military history, his book on the Battle of Edgcote is his first full length publication.

Don't forget the Banbury Historical Society Library - open for a peaceful afternoon's browsing every Wednesday afternoon, 2 - 5 pm.

The Bloxham Village History Club will have their monthly meeting on the 16th October in the Jubilee Park Hall, Barley Close in Bloxham. They have Simon Batten who will be talking about The Colourful life of Ellen Hinde of Bloxham.

I have attached a sheet with all the details of our lectures for the season: if you are also a member of a local or village history society, could you please advertise our talks to the members? Put it on a noticeboard? Circulate information via an enewsletter? I am happy to publicize village society talks and events in return.

Finally, the OLHA bulletin for October has details of all sorts of interesting things happening in the county. To access the full bulleting, click this url.

With best wishes,
Deborah Hayter

 

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(Newsletter of 3 Sep 2019)

Dear all,

September is upon us and the academic year begins again and brings with it the first of Banbury Historical Society’s lectures on Thursday September 12that 7.30 pm.  As before, the society’s lectures take place in the Education room of Banbury Museum and the entrance is from the back, from Spiceball Park Road.  To celebrate the start of another season we will be providing a glass of wine for members from 6.30 pm, so do come in time for that.

If you saw the list of lectures on the back of Cake & Cockhorse you might be expecting Dr. Eric Sidebottom to talk about the role of disease in world history but unfortunately he contacted me just before I had the programme cards printed to say that he couldn’t manage that date after all.  I had no time to reorganize the whole programme so slotted myself into the gap.  I will be talking about Provision for the poor:  the crisis in the parishes in the 18th century.  I have taught courses at Oxford about how the poor were managed and supported, from medieval charity to the modern benefit system, and I have often been asked to give lectures to local societies about the Victorian Workhouse.  Most people know something about the dreaded Union Workhouse (Oliver Twist and so on), but few people know much about what had happened before that, so I have several times talked about the 17th and 18th centuries instead, which is I think much more interesting.  This ties in nicely with our most recent volume of records, Banbury’s People in the 18thcentury, which contains some of the Overseers of the Poor records, and I shall be able to refer to those.

During the 17th century the Old Poor Law had seemed to manage to cope with those who were unable to support themselves, and local communities looked after their own poor.  However in the 18th century numbers and problems escalated till many parishes were overwhelmed by the demands made upon them.  This proved to be a crisis point as the Old Poor Law and the parish system it set up could no longer cope with the growing numbers of unemployed.  This crisis is what led to the draconian reforms of the New Poor Law and the Union Workhouses in the 1830s.

I hope all members have now received their copies of Jeremy Gibson’s book, and that lots of you have bought Barrie Trinder’s latest book:  The Midlands Canals in 1871 – the evidence of census.  (£14.95).  Some of you will remember Barrie giving us a talk about the Oxford Canal and its canal families, largely based on his research into the census, and this book enlarges on that and of course, is based on his vast knowledge of the industrial revolution and all the systems that underpinned it.  This book is for sale in the Museum shop,

The new BHS library in the Museum did not open during August, but will now be opening again every Wednesday afternoon from 2 – 5 pm.  To remind you, the library contains everything that was ever written about Banbury, is very comprehensive in its coverage of Oxfordshire, and has many volumes, pamphlets and journals from Warwickshire, Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshire too.  These are for reference only, no borrowing.  In the same room there is an extensive collection of photographs of Banbury and the surrounding villages, which belong to the Museum.

I have been asked to publicize a plea from St. Mary's Church:

Banbury’s only Grade 1 listed building needs you.
St. Mary’s Church Banbury is looking for volunteers for the Heritage Open days for 13th – 21st September.    St Mary’s Church, rebuilt by Act of Parliament in the 1790s, replacing an even larger medieval building, is Banbury’s only Grade I listed building and its most conspicuous landmark. It was the largest parish church built in England in the 18th century, and remains among the top 1% in terms of size. It has been identified as a ‘major parish church’ by the Church Buildings Council.

During heritage open days, 13th to 21st September the church will be mounting an exhibition highlighting the buildings history and that of the previous larger medieval church on the site.

We need volunteers to help visitors interpret the building and conduct guided tours and perhaps join a team providing tours in the future. Information and training will be provided.
You don’t need to be a church goer or even a Christian. An interest in history will do.

Contact Brendan O’Farrell at  ofarrell017@hotmail.com or 07463 739358

Simon Townsend has asked me to publicise a fund-raising event for the Museum in November.  For over a hundred years Saxon brooches found in Hornton have been in the British Museum.  The Hornton History Group has led a campaign to have these restored to the locality and they will be unveiled in Banbury Museum on Saturday 16th November.  Then Professor John Blair will give a lecture about the Anglo-Saxons in Oxfordshire.  Some of you will know his book on Anglo-Saxon Oxfordshire:  he is one of the foremost  scholars of the period and well worth hearing. 

Full details and to book your tickets here …
https://www.banburymuseum.org/events/the-return-of-the-hornton-anglo-saxon-brooches/

 


 

 

Finally, here is the link to the OLHA ebulletin for August.  Such a lot going on, which you can access via this url. 

 

With best wishes

Deborah Hayter

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(Posted 27th July 2019)

Dear all,  
This is my last e-newsletter of the 2018-2019 season as we all have August off and then start history again in September.

Thanks to all who came to the AGM which was held on the 11th July in South Newington church.  We were sorry not to see Lord Saye and Sele, our president, who usually presides very expeditiously over the AGM, but our Vice-President Barrie Trinder was an efficient deputy for the occasion.  Members were able to have a good look at the wall paintings in the church, which have had a lot of restoration work in the last few years, and are beautifully explained in a good series of information boards there.  We then walked up the road to the Village Hall, which happens to be an early (1692) Quaker meeting house, for refreshments.  The hall has been little altered apart from the addition of modern plumbing and kitchen, and can be easily imagined in its original manifestation.

At the AGM Barrie was able to introduce (even launch) the Society’s latest volume,Banbury’s People in the Eighteenth Century, by Jeremy Gibson.  This is a magnificent work with transcriptions of a number of 18th-century sources.  The most important is the Banbury Vestry Book, covering almost the whole of the century and mostly concerned with the administration of the Poor Law, but Jeremy has also included some other documents such as extracts from the records of the Banbury Corporation.  There’s lots of history in there – and any family historians with roots in Banbury will find it invaluable.

Members who were there at the AGM were able to collect their copies and it would be excellent if some of the rest of you who are local were able to go into the Museum to get yours.  Postage is so expensive!  If you are able to come into town to collect one they will be held not in the shop but at the desk by the Pye Gallery (the far end of the bridge from the Castle Quay entrance). 

BHS members will get Banbury’s People for free as it is the latest in our Records Series but Barrie Trinder has also produced a book this summer:  The Midlands Canals in 1871 – the evidence of census.  (£14.95).  Some of you will remember Barrie giving us a talk about the Oxford Canal and its canal families, largely based on his research into the census, and this book enlarges on that and of course, is based on his vast knowledge of the industrial revolution and all the systems that underpinned it.  This book will be for sale in the Museum shop, and Barrie will be doing a signing session there on Saturday 17th August from 10.30 am. 

Many people have said to us over the years that Brian Little’s pieces in theBanbury Guardian  would make an excellent book, and his untimely death has spurred us on to do something about this.  Barrie Trinder has started the ball rolling and we hope that our next BHS volume will be a collection of Brian’s splendid pieces about Banbury as a fitting memorial to him. 

You will soon be receiving the summer issue of Cake and Cockhorse, together with your programme card for the 2019/20 season of lectures and activities.  We hope that there will be something for everybody therein, and so that you put it into your diaries, the next BHS year starts off with drinks as usual at 6.30 pm on Thursday 12th September followed by Dr. Eric Sidebottom with a lecture entitled ‘Rewriting history:  the importance of disease in world history’. 

Simon Townsend has asked me to publicise a fund-raising event for the Museum in November.  For over a hundred years Saxon brooches found in Hornton have been in the British Museum.  The Hornton History Group has led a campaign to have these restored to the locality and they will be unveiled in Banbury Museum on Saturday 16th November.  Then Professor John Blair will give a lecture about the Anglo-Saxons in Oxfordshire.  Some of you will know his book on Anglo-Saxon Oxfordshire:  he is one of the foremost  scholars of the period at the moment and well worth hearing. 

Full details and to book your tickets here …
https://www.banburymuseum.org/events/the-return-of-the-hornton-anglo-saxon-brooches/

Finally, and rather late, here is the link to the OLHA e-bulletin for July.  For those of you who still need historical events, expeditions and talks, even in the summer, there is still plenty going on, which you can access via this url.

With best wishes, Deborah Hayter

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(Posted 18th July 2019)

Some of our members joined the Banbury People's Park Centenary celebrations on 14 July 2019.  Rosemary and Chris Leadbeater, dressed as suffragettes, joined the pre-event procession and Chairman, Helen Forde was interviewed for local radio (Radio Puritan, the official station for Banbury United Football Club). The "lady on the white horse" paraded around the park during the opening ceremony conducted by the High Sheriff of Banbury, Sir Tony Baldry.

 

 

 

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(Newsletter of 2nd July 2019)

Dear all, 
This is another reminder that our Annual General Meeting will be held next week on Thursday July 11th at 5.30 pm in South Newington, at the church of St. Peter-ad-Vincula.  South Newington is on the A361 halfway between and Chipping Norton and the church is easily found in the middle of the village if you turn off the main road opposite the pub.
As is usual, at our AGM we elect the members of the committee and we are always keen to have new members with new ideas so please do come forward if you would like to help run the society.  It is also an opportunity to ask any questions or to make suggestions.   If you haven't already seen it, I am attaching the AGM notice and Agenda(**).
After the AGM and a chance to look at the nationally-important wall paintings in the church we shall walk up the road to the village hall for the usual refreshments.  The village hall happens to be one of the earliest Quaker meeting-houses in the area.
With best wishes
Deborah Hayter

(** See Members' Documents)

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Newsletter of 8th May 2019

Dear all
I hope you have all remembered that the first of our summer outings is taking place next week, on Thursday 16th May.  This will be a village visit to Charlton, and will be focused first on  Rainsborough Camp, a large iron-age hill fort just outside the village, and then returning to the village proper, we shall look at a blacksmith's forge, still complete with tools, anvil and bellows, and a set of Victorian stables.  I shall be leading this, and we shall meet at 5.30 pm at Rainsborough, which is half a mile outside Charlton on the road to Aynho.  Parking will be in the field and note that we shall have to walk across a field to reach the fort so sensible shoes or boots if it's wet would be a good idea.

On Thursday  June 13th, we have organized a walking tour of Jericho, in Oxford.  This was originally an industrial area based on the Oxford Canal.  This will be led by David Clark, whom some of you will remember giving us an excellent lecture a few years back.  He is an architectural historian with a huge knowledge of Oxford and its buildings and is always worth listening to.  We shall meet at 6 pm outside the Oxford University Press building in Walton Street.

New Website:    we need our members to keep looking at the new website which Ian West has created for the society.   Google still prefers to direct enquirers for BHS to the Museum website (where we have been hosted for some time) but if you persevere you will eventually get to the brilliant new website at www.banburyhistoricalsociety.org.   The more members go to it the more likely it is that Google will eventually agree that it is the one.  We would very much like to hear your comments on the new site, particularly problems and criticisms. We hope it is clearly laid out, easy to navigate, visually attractive, and provides all the necessary information that you might need.

The new Banbury Historical Society Library:  is now open every Wednesday afternoon from 2 - 5 pm and we would like some more members to come along and investigate it. (Upstairs in the Museum).  So far there have been few readers and researchers.  It is a wonderful resource:  it contains everything that was ever written about Banbury, is very comprehensive in its coverage of Oxfordshire, and has many volumes, pamphlets and journals from Warwickshire, Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshre too.  These are for reference only, no borrowing.

​There are still a few places left for this coming Saturday, the 11th May, for the OLHA Spring Study Day which will be on Wychwood:  the Forest then and now, at New Beaconsfield Hall, Station Road, Shipton-under-Wychwood, OX7 6BQ. 

Dr. Simon Townley will be talking on Wychwood Forest 800 – 2000, and Neil Clennell, Chief Executive of the Wychwood Project, will talk about it. In the afternoon there will be a guided walk around Shipton, led by members of the Wychwoods Local History Society, ending at the Wild Garden, which was once part of the grounds of Shipton Court.  Click here for further information, and here to book on-line (or download a booking formhere).

​Those of you who are interested in military history, especially local battles, might like to know that the Northamptonshire Battlefields Trust is celebrating (if that's the right word) the 550th anniversary of the Battle of Edgecote.  Graham Evans has written a book about it, and we have booked him to come and talk to the society in October about its significance.  There is also a conference at the end of July in Northampton  and if you click on this link you can see all the information:

https://northantsbattles.com/edgcote-conference-2019/

Edgcote Conference – 2019 – Northamptonshire Battlefields Society - northantsbattles.com
“... bothe the armies met by chaunce, in a faire plain, nere to a toune called Hedgecot ...” To commemorate the 550th anniversary of one of the most misunderstood ...
northantsbattles.com
And we seem to be in a period of battle anniversaries:  Cropredy village is celebrating the 375th anniversary of the Battle of Cropredy Bridge on 29th June. Cropredy Village has set up a Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/cropredy375/) & website to provide further information: http://www.cropredy375.uk/ (work in progress).

​With best wishes, and hoping for a fine day next Thursday


Deborah Hayter

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Newsletter of 8th April, 2019

Dear all,

Everyone who sees the Banbury Guardian will have seen the very sad news of the sudden and unexpected death of Brian Little.  We are all shocked and saddened, and send our very best wishes and condolences to Margaret and the rest of the family.  His various publications and his regular weekly columns in the Guardian showed how much he knew about Banbury and its history.  He was on the committee of this society for very many years, and its chair for several.  We shall miss him very much.   There will be a Memorial service for Brian at 2 pm, Wednesday 17th April at St. Hugh’s Church, Ruskin Road, OX16 9HU.

 
Another brief reminder about our session this week on Thursday April 11th.  Karey Morley, who leads a regular ‘Reminiscences’ group in the Museum, is going to lead this session of Oral History, and it will focus on Banbury in World War Two.  You may not be old enough to remember it, but you may have memories of parents or grandparents talking about it.  Attached is a list of questions:  please have a look at these and a think about them.  Karey will be playing us some recordings already made, and there will be some informal discussion with opportunities to join in.

New Website:   we are so grateful to Ian West who has been working away to create a new website for the society.  From today this url, www.banburyhistoricalsociety.org, which used to point to a page on the Banbury museum website, should now take you to  our own website. We would very much like to hear your comments on the new site, particularly problems and criticisms. We hope it is clearly laid out, easy to navigate, visually attractive, and provides all the necessary information that you might need.

 
The new BHS library is now open and if you come along on April 11th early at 6.45 pm there will be an opportunity to have a look around it.  Jeremy Gibson, one of the founder members of the society in 1958, gave his extensive library of historical reference works to the society for the benefit of its members when he moved away from Oxfordshire.  These have now been housed in purpose-built bookshelves on the first floor of Banbury Museum, and the library is to be open to the public every Wednesday afternoon, 2 – 5 pm, from April 3rd.  It contains everything that was ever written about Banbury, is very comprehensive in its coverage of Oxfordshire, and has many volumes, pamphlets and journals from Warwickshire, Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshre too.  These are for reference only, no borrowing.

We still need volunteers to man (or woman) the room on Wednesday afternoons.  The Wednesdays in April are covered, but if you would like to volunteer in principle – just occasionally, or perhaps one Wednesday a month, could you please contact Helen Forde who is in charge of the rota?  (helenforde1@googlemail.com)  Volunteering means being on site to open the room, answer any questions, refer to museum staff if necessary, and lock up at the end of the afternoon.  An induction session – or more if necessary – will be offered for those who are interested, together with a tour of the library.

The remaining summer activities are as follows:

Thursday 16th May 2019

Village visit to Charlton: iron age hill fort; Victorian stables;  blacksmith’s forge and more.

   Led by Deborah Hayter;  meet at 5.30 pm at Rainsborough (half a mile outside Charlton on the road to Aynho); parking for access to the hill-fort.  We will be walking across a field to get there.

 
Thursday 13th June 2019

Walking Tour of Jericho, Oxford: originally an industrial area based on the Oxford Canal.  Led by David Clark; meet at 6 pm outside the Oxford University Press building in Walton Street.


Thursday 11th July 2019at 5.30pm. 

Annual General Meeting. To be held in South Newington Church.  South Newington is on the A361 halfway between Banbury and Chipping Norton.  Park where you can in the centre of the village;  after the meeting in the church (famous for its wall-paintings) we shall walk up the road for drinks in the village hall which is one of the earliest Quaker meeting houses in the area.

   We expect to be distributing our latest records volume at the meeting.

 
The Oxfordshire Local History Association spring study day will be on Wychwood:  the Forest then and now, and will be held on Saturday 11th May 2019 at New Beaconsfield Hall, Station Road, Shipton-under-Wychwood, OX7 6BQ.

Dr. Simon Townley will be talking on Wychwood Forest 800 – 2000, and Neil Clennell, Chief Executive of the Wychwood Project, will talk about it.  In the afternoon there will be a guided walk around Shipton, led by members of the Wychwoods Local History Society, ending at the Wild Garden, which was once part of the grounds of Shipton Court.

Click here for further information, and here to book on-line (or download a booking formhere).

BHS book reviewed in Denmark!  The Historical Society’s latest publication, Barrie Trinder’s Junctions at Banbury, has been widely, and generally favourably, reviewed in this country, but it is pleasantly surprising to find a three-page review in a Danish publication, the 2018 issue of  Jernbane Historie: Jenrnbanernes Teknologi og Kulturhistorie, which is published by Denmark’s Jernbanemuseum. the national railway museum on the island of Funen. This is a well-informed review – the author has obviously seen the remaining pillars of the viaduct at Hook Norton – and makes interesting comparisons between market towns in Denmark and England. The journal is beautifully produced, and extends to just over a hundred pages, with three articles on Danish railways, with summaries in English, as well as other reviews.

There is still time to catch the Spring Exhibition at Banbury Museum – on until 12th May:  British Life Photography Awards .   This exhibition brings together contemporary and imaginative images that capture the essence and spirit of British life.  Discover established and emerging photographers,  and understand the relevance of photography in modern life.

 

Members of the Steeple Aston Village Archive Trust will lead a guided walk around Steeple Aston on Sunday 9 June, 2-4pm. Participants will learn about the buildings, people and stories of this interesting Oxfordshire village. Places are free, but limited, so booking is required. Tea will be provided, for which donations will be welcome.  E-mail or phone 01869 347046 for details and booking.

The Open Spaces Society which campaigns to maintain access to public rights of way and common land, is running two more ‘Restoring the Record Training Days’  These aim to enthuse, enable and empower rights-of-way researchers to make definitive map modification order applications to ensure that routes that would be extinguished in 2026 are saved from the cut-off date. These will be at Wolverhampton Racecourse, Wolverhampton Saturday 13th April 2019 at 9 am and Bicton Village Hall Shrewsbury on Sunday 14th April at 9 am.  For further information phone 02476 840515 or email access@bhs.org.uk. 

The OLHA bulletin for April is available by clicking  this url.

With best wishes, Deborah Hayter
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Newsletter of 28th March 2019

Dear all,

This is a rather long e-newsletter and there is a lot of interesting stuff for you to read so please make sure you get to the end!

The last of our ‘indoor’ activities for this year is coming up on Thursday April 11th.  This will not be a straightforward lecture but will be based on oral history.  Karey Morley, who leads a regular ‘Reminiscences’ group in the Museum, is going to lead it, and it will focus on Banbury in World War Two.  You may not be old enough to remember it, but you may have memories of parents or grandparents talking about it.  Attached is a list of questions:  please have a look at these and a think about them.  Karey will be playing us some recordings already made, and there will be some informal discussion with opportunities to join in.

Those of you who were at the last lecture will have heard about the opening of the Jeremy Gibson Libraryin the museum.  The Museum will open the library before the meeting on April 11th at 6.45 pm, so do come along then if you would like to have a look. Jeremy Gibson, one of the founder members of the society in 1958, (many of you will remember him and he came to our 60thanniversary AGM last summer) gave his extensive library of historical reference works to the society for the benefit of its members when he moved away from Oxfordshire.  These have now been housed in purpose-built bookshelves on the first floor of Banbury Museum, and the library is to be open to the public every Wednesday afternoon, 2 – 5 pm, from April 3rd.  It contains everything that was ever written about Banbury, is very comprehensive in its coverage of Oxfordshire, and has many volumes, pamphlets and journals from Warwickshire, Northamptonshire and Buckinghamshre too.  These are for reference only, no borrowing.

We need volunteers to man (or woman) the room on Wednesday afternoons.  The Wednesdays in April are covered, but if you would like to volunteer in principle – just occasionally, or perhaps one Wednesday a month, could you please contact Helen Forde who is in charge of the rota?  (helenforde1@googlemail.com)  Volunteering means being on site to open the room, answer any questions, refer to museum staff if necessary, and lock up at the end of the afternoon.  An induction session – or more if necessary – will be offered for those who are interested, together with a tour of the library.

We look forward to seeing lots of you at the rest of our summer activities as follows:

Thursday 16th May 2019
Village visit to Charlton:iron age hill fort; Victorian stables;  blacksmith’s forge and more.

   Led by Deborah Hayter;  meet at 5.30 pm at Rainsborough (half a mile outside Charlton on the road to Aynho); parking for access to the hill-fort.  We will be walking across a field to get there so make sure you are wearing adequate footwear if it is wet.

Thursday 13th June 2019
Walking Tour of Jericho, Oxford: originally an industrial area based on the Oxford Canal.  Led by David Clark; meet at 6 pm outside the Oxford University Press building in Walton Street.

Thursday 11th July 2019 at 5.30pm. Annual General Meeting.
To be held in South Newington Church.  South Newington is on the A361 halfway between Banbury and Chipping Norton.  Park where you can in the centre of the village;  after the meeting in the church (famous for its wall-paintings) we shall walk up the road for drinks in the village hall which is one of the earliest Quaker meeting houses in the area.

   We expect to be distributing our latest records volume at the meeting.

The Oxfordshire Record Society is celebrating its Centenary this year with a Symposium   to be held at the Soldiers of Oxfordshire Museum, Park Street, Woodstock. OX20 1SN on Thursday 13 June 2019, commencing at 2.00pm.

2019 marks one hundred years of the Oxfordshire Record Society and its work to publish primary sources for the history of Oxfordshire and to raise awareness and understanding of this vital evidence of the county. This special centenary event builds on the society’s two most recent volumes, the World War Two diary of Madge Martin 1938-1943, which was published in 2018, and the bishop’s visitation returns for each Oxfordshire parish in 1914 and 1918, which will  be published later this year.

The impact of conflict and war on the county has been a recurrent theme in its history and archaeology, not just in the twentieth-century. The symposium will feature presentations on Oxfordshire in the iron age and during seventeenth-century civil wars, as well as two world wars. It will be illustrated from the society’s publications together with current research. ORS is delighted to work in conjunction with the Soldiers of Oxfordshire Museum for this event.

After the symposium, there will be an introduction to the Museum and a special opening of the galleries, followed by a celebratory centenary drinks’ reception.

Symposium schedule

2.00pm Gary Lock Iron Age Oxfordshire : war, conflict and hillforts. 

2.40pm Andrew Hopper The Human Costs of Civil War : the Oxfordshire experience. 

3.15pm Tea, coffee and home made cakes ; book display and sales. 

3.45pm Kate Tiller and Ursula Corcoran Oxfordshire in the Second World War from maps and diaries.

 4.20pm Mark Smith The Impact of the First World War on Oxfordshire : the bishop’s visitation returns 1914 and 1918.

In order to book your place:  either online http://www.sofo.org.uk/product/orccs2019/. You will receive a confirmation of your booking which will act as your ticket.

0r at the Museum reception desk during its normal opening hours

Or “snailmail” to the society’s Hon General Secretary, Paul Gaskell by April 7th (if you are a member; after April 14th if you are not)(28 Bulan Road, Headington, Oxford OX3 7HT)

If you are interested in the history of Oxfordshire, you should be a member of the ORS in order to support the publication of its excellent volumes of research.  Many members joined (myself included) in order to get a free copy of their absolutely excellentHistorical Atlas of Oxfordshire , which came out in 2010.

Oxfordshire Local History Association spring study day will be on Wychwood: the Forest then and now.

This will be held on Saturday 11th May 2019at New Beaconsfield Hall, Station Road, Shipton-under-Wychwood, OX7 6BQ.

Dr. Simon Townley will be talking on Wychwood Forest 800 – 2000, and Neil Clennell, Chief Executive of the Wychwood Project, will talk about the project. In the afternoon there will be a guided walk around Shipton, led by members of the Wychwoods Local History Society, ending at the Wild Garden, which was once part of the grounds of Shipton Court.

Click here for further information, and here to book on-line (or download a booking formhere).

I’ve been given preliminary information that Cropredy is going to celebrate the 375th anniversary of the Battle of Cropredy Bridge on 29th June. Cropredy Village has set up a Facebook page & website to provide further information: https://www.facebook.com/cropredy375/ 
& http://www.cropredy375.uk/ (work in progress).

Finally, the  Council for British Archaeology, in the South Midlands, is presenting a Northamptonshire Archaeological Review at Bugbrooke on Saturday 6th April 2019.  I have attached the full information if you are interested.

With best wishes, Deborah Hayter

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Newsletter of  5th March 2019

Dear all, 
On March 14th we have Liz Woolley coming to talk to us again.  She will be speaking  on Child labour in nineteenth-century Oxfordshire:  ‘It will do him more good than going to school”   ‘Child labour’ evokes an image  of young children toiling in the grimy factories and mines of the Midlands and the North. Yet in rural Oxfordshire, child labour was as much a feature of everyday life in the  19th century as in industrialised areas.  This talk tells the story of our county’s child workers, many of whom started work part-time at the age of six or seven. They worked in agriculture, in domestic service and in lace-making, gloving and in a host of other small-scale occupations. The talk highlights the differences between girls’ and boys’ experiences of work, and the particular fates of pauper apprentices. It also shows that, contrary to popular belief, cottage industry and agricultural work were by no means the ‘soft option’ in comparison with work in the factories and mines of industrialised areas.

Liz Woolley  is a local historian specialising in aspects of the history of Oxford and Oxfordshire. She is particularly interested in the history of the city’s “town” – as opposed to “gown” – and in the everyday lives of rural people across the county, chiefly during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.  Liz is an experienced speaker, guide, tutor, researcher and writer who is keen to help individuals and groups to enjoy finding out about the history of their local area.

For anyone who missed Keith Westcott's talk about the discoveries at Broughton, he will be repeating it at Bloxham to the village history group there on March 20th , 7.30 pm in the Jubilee Hall, off Brickle Lane.  Get there early!

This next Sunday  (10th March, 2 - 4 pm)there is an exhibition in Eydon village hall put on by the Eydon Historical Research Group.  They will be launching their 11th publication, a collection of articles about various aspects of their local history, and the exhibition will show a number of old photographs and a selection of historical artifacts.

I have attached some information about two archaeology conferences taking place in Northamptonshire, one on Sunday 17th March and one on the 6th April.

The OLHA bulletin for March is available to you all by clicking this url.

with best wishes


Deborah Hayter

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Dear all, 
This is just another reminder that this week's lecture is a really local one on February 14th.  Keith Westcott is going to tell us all about Discovering the Broughton Hoard and the Broughton Roman Villa.    Keith has himself been instrumental in these discoveries so we shall be hearing all about it at first hand.  (You may have read about it in the Banbury Guardian).  The Broughton hoard may have belonged to a 17th century Queen after selling off the Crown Jewels, and the Roman Villa, which has not yet been fully explored or excavated, may turn out to be one of England's largest courtyard villas.

Keith has pursued his interest in local history for 25 years alongside a rather different professional career as a Standards expert in Heating Systems.  He has recently formed the Institute of Metal Detectorists, following archaeological principles,  and has lectured on this topic at an OUDCE Day School. 


Everyone who is a member of this society is also a member of the Oxfordshire Local History Association (OLHA);    their brilliant secretary Liz Woolley sends out a terrific roundup every month of anything and everything that could possibly interest local historians in Oxfordshire.  If you would like to see this bulletin click on this url. 

with best wishes, Deborah Hayter

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7th Jan 2019

Dear all, 

Happy New Year to all our members.  Somehow January is already fleeing past me and I should have sent out an e-newsletter last week.  I am hoping that you all have Thursday January 10th in your diaries when we have Rowena Archer coming to talk to us about Alice Chaucer, who became Duchess of Suffolk.  Dr Rowena E. Archer trained as a medieval historian at Bristol and Oxford and is now a Fellow of Brasenose College and lecturer in medieval history at Brasenose and Christ church. She researches aristocratic culture in general but with a specific interest in women.  One of those women is the subject of this month’s talk, entitled The Rise and Rise of Alice Chaucer, Duchess of Suffolk.  Alice was the granddaughter of Geoffrey Chaucer and was born a commoner with no land or titles. Through her marriages she became a countess and then a duchess. She was widowed in 1450 and spent the next  25 years defending her only son and the family lands, property which made her one of the wealthiest nobles of the 15th century.

On Wednesday the 6th February the Brackley and District History Society is holding their AGM followed by a talk by Gerald Lesinski about the Lord Leycester Hospital in Warwick.  The Hospital is a set of medieval buildings which became in the 16th century an almshouse for retired soldiers – lots of interesting history to hear about.  Brackley Methodist Hall, High street. 

There’s still time to sign up for one of the weekly classes starting in January at Oxford University’s Department of Continuing Education.   There’s always more history to learn about! https://www.conted.ox.ac.uk/search#/courses?s=&areas=History%252C%20including%20local%20and%20social&format=1&sort=availability 

It’s just possible that if you click on that you will be taken to the list of courses currently on offer.

 News from Banbury Museum:   

Pop Art in Print is proving to be a huge success, and continues until the 3rd of March. The exhibition showcases artwork from the modern age’s most important art movement, including music artwork legends Richard Hamilton and Peter Blake.

Amongst the featured work is Adonis in Y Fronts by Richard Hamilton, who was responsible for the ground-breaking White Album cover for The Beatles. Also on display is Peter Blakes’ Beach Boys, which was based on a press photograph of the band. Peter Blake went on to design the iconic record sleeve for the Beatles’ Sergeant Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band.

Your ticket entry to Pop Art in Print now includes two family fun quizzes, one suitable for under 5s and one for older children. Spark your child’s curiosity, activate their imagination and encourage them to take a closer look.
 

The latest bulletin from the Oxfordshire Local History Association (OLHA) is now available online, and all members of BHS are automatically members.  You can read the bulletin by clicking on 
 this url.
With best wishes
Deborah Hayter

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2018/10/29

Dear all, 
    Our last lecture was a terrific high-speed adventure through the interface between genetics and archaeology bringing us the very latest research in this very fast-developing field. 
    Our next lecture is much more locally based but is also the result of recent work.  On the  8thNovember Dr. Rosemary Leadbeater, who has recently joined the society, will be talking about  ‘the constant terror of this loathsome and fatal disease’; facing smallpox in 18th-century Banbury.   Rosemary is an Associate Lecturer at Oxford Brookes University, and her talk takes an in-depth look at the transmission of smallpox in Banbury in the eighteenth century and the impact of the disease on local families. It will also discuss the ways in which communities were successful in helping to control the disease.   Rosemary teaches social history and the history of medicine and health at Oxford Brookes, and completed her PhD thesis in 2016, with the title Experiencing Smallpox in Eighteenth-Century England. She has also investigated pauper letters as a historical source and written on Florence Nightingale.
Don’t forget that access to the Education room at the Museum is via the canal towpath through the Cafe.
 
    The Society will again be holding a pre-Christmas book sale, featuring its own publications and those written by members, at this meeting on 8 November. 2018, a Dr Leadbetter’s article in the recent edition of Cake & Cockhorse has aroused much interest, and the meeting is likely to be well-attended.

     Members of the Society are welcome to bring copies of their books for sale:  the book stall will be managed by Clare and Stephen Jakeman, and authors bringing books for sale are requested to list them, and present the list, with the books, to Clare or Stephen. Any money from sales and any unsold books will be returned once sales have ceased after the end of the meeting. 

    Prices of all books should be clearly marked.

    This is a sale of new books that might be given as Christmas presents. Please do not bring second hand books.

    Please do not bring an excessive number of books as display space is limited, and past experience shows that at most only three or four copies of any one book are likely to be sold.

    The Banbury Historical Society is proud to have published 35 books on the history of the town and adjacent parts of Oxfordshire, Northamptonshire and Warwickshire in the 60 years since its foundation, and a 36th volume is at an advanced stage of production. The Society also takes pride in the number and range of publications produced by its members.

    On Wednesday November 7th there is a change to the advertised programme of the Brackley History Society:   the talk will now be given by Chris Rowe, and it will be about the Eleanor Crosses.

    As described in a previous enewsletter, Dr. Richard Buckley will be talking about the search for, and discovery of, Richard III’s bones under the car park in Leicester in Kings Sutton on 24th November in aid of Save the Children (7.30 pm followed by drinks and canapes, tickets £15 from Margot Bell 01295 811166  or margot.bell@mypostoffice.co.uk).  

    If you’re interested in that, but can’t make it, Dr. Buckley will be talking to the Middleton Cheney History Society on Monday 26th November 7.30 pm.  This will be in All Saints Church, Middleton Cheney.

With best wishes,

Deborah Hayter

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